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Graham Township was named after James B. Graham, who came to the county with his parents in 1822, but who did not become a resident of this locality until some 14 or 15 years later. The town of Grahamton was named for him, being one of its most enterprising residents. He built both saw and grist mills there and also engaged in the lumber business. In 1852 James moved to the borough of Clearfield, of which he became a prominent citizen. Jacob Hubler and Bassel Crowel, came to this locality about 1827 or 1828. Each reared a large family, cleared and worked prosperous farms. In 1864 Jacob Hubler was arrested for a political offense and was imprisoned at Fort Mifflin, but was subsequently released. He died in 1868.

Conrad W. Kyler, who came here in 1843, cleared and developed a fine farm. He was made county commissioner in 1875 and for ten years was the justice of the peace of Graham Township. Other early settlers were Samuel Turner, the Monos, the Hitchins, the Kepples, the Smeals, and the Flegels; while among the taxable inhabitants in 1857 (the year after Graham Township was established) were as follows:

  • B.F. Ackley, M.D.
  • Moses Boggs
  • William Burlinggame
  • William Bciinett
  • William Bagley
  • William Burge
  • John Cook
  • William Cole
  • M. & S. Catherman
  • David Chollar
  • James Curley
  • Benjamin Chance
  • Frederick Conklin
  • Francis Colegrove
  • Samuel Davidson
  • Thomas Duncason
  • John Dixon
  • Robert Elder
  • William English
  • Thomas H. Forcey
  • Martin French
  • Francis Graham
  • Ira Green
  • William R. Green
  • Amos Hubler
  • George Hoover
  • Jacob Hoover
  • John Holt
  • Michael Fink
  • Jacob Hubler
  • Simon Hauckenbury
  • Joseph Ishman
  • John H. Irvin
  • Edmund Jones
  • Henry Kyler
  • Conrad W. Kyler
  • Isaac Kyler
  • Peter Keppler
  • John M. Katon
  • Samuel Lonsberry
  • Benjamin Lonsbury
  • Abraham Lonsbury
  • Rev. J.M. Mason
  • Mark McGuire
  • George Moyer
  • John Martin
  • Jacob Mack
  • George Nearhood
  • Henry Nearhood
  • William Phenix
  • Christian Pace
  • Jonas Powel
  • Harrison Ross
  • F.W. Russell
  • William Roiston
  • Alexander Roiston
  • William P. Smeal
  • John Smeal
  • Samuel Smeal
  • George Stever
  • William Shimmel, Jr.
  • John Wihelm
  • Jacob Wihelm
  • William Woolridge
  • James E. Watson
  • George W. Wells

and others not recorded. This will serve to show who were the pioneers of Graham Township, through some of the above mentioned were the sons or descendant of the original pioneers of this locality.

The following roll shows the name of residents of the township who were then subject to military duty. They were:

  • Amos Bornaman
  • William Burge
  • Martin Catherman
  • Simon Catherman
  • Benjamin Chance
  • David Chollar
  • Frederick Conklin
  • Cornelius Crowell
  • David Crowell
  • Patrick Curley
  • George Davidson
  • William Davidson
  • John Discorn
  • Richard Dodson
  • William English
  • Henry Evans
  • Samuel Flegal
  • William R. Green
  • George P. Hall
  • Henry Hamlin
  • George Hoover
  • Amos Hubler
  • Andrew Hunter
  • John H. Irvin
  • William G. Johnson
  • John S. Jury
  • Peter Kepple
  • Isaac Kyler
  • Benjamin Lonsbury, Jr.
  • George Lozier
  • William H. McClure
  • James McGuire
  • Jacob Mock
  • Jonas Mons
  • George Nearhood
  • Henry Nearhood
  • John Nearhood
  • James P. Nelson
  • Christian Pace
  • Alexander Ralston
  • William Shimmel
  • Andrew Smeal
  • Benjamin H. Smeal, Jr.
  • John Smeal
  • Samuel Smeal
  • William P. Smeal
  • Robert Steward
  • David Turner
  • John W. Turner
  • James E. Watson
  • John Woolslangle

Graham Township, thus formed, occupies a position in the eastern part of the county. It is bounded on the north, by the river Susquehanna; east by Morris Township; south by Morris Township; and west by Bradford, and a small part of Boggs Townships.

The chief pursuit of the inhabitants of this locality, in the past, has been lumbering; and there has been, perhaps, none of the township of the county that, in proportion to area, that have produced a better quality of lumber and timber of all grades than this; but as this branch of business has declined, the people have turned their attention to agriculture, and, be it said to their credit, there are in Graham some of the best and most desirable farming lands in the entire country.

The village of Grahamton was the trading center of the township, and occupied a position in the extreme western part, near Bradford Township line.(See more information on the Graham Tab.)

The spiritual welfare of the people of the township is guarded by religious societies of two denominations - The United Brethren and The Methodist Episcopal - each of which denominations has two houses had two houses of worship. The former are located, one at Fairview and the other at Summit Hill. The churches of the Methodist Episcopal society are located, one at Center Hill (no longer standing) and the other at Palestine.

The schools of the township were five in number, known and designed as follows: Fairview, Palestine, Center Hill, Black Oak, and the Johnston School.